Agreement Adjectives Spanish

Most adjectives must correspond in sex to the nameinus they change. In the description of a male name such as “Amigo,” we must use a male adjective such as “Honesto.” As with substantives, Spanish male adjectives usually end in vowels -O like “Bonito” and “Creativo,” z.B. “El niéo es bonito y gordo.” In addition, some words that end on -R are also considered male adjectives. Many common adjectives end in -o. These adjectives have four forms. The following words all mean “tall”: adjectives can come before or after names, or they can be used with verbs such as ser (“being”) to describe names. But (with the exception of invariable adjectives), they will always be in tune with the nouns they describe in both numbers and genders. The same rule applies to certain articles (the equivalent of “die”) and unspecified articles (a class of words that contains “a,” “an” and “any”), which are sometimes considered adjectiveswww.thoughtco.com/noun-adjective-agreement-3078114. The rule that has no English equivalent is that individual names are accompanied by singular adjectives and plural nouns are accompanied by plural adjectives. Male names are described or limited by male adjectives, and female names are described or limited by female adjectives. Possessive forms such as meo (mine) and Tuyo (your) also function as Spanish adjectives. However, the difference is that possessive ususally only comes in verbs in complete clauses (although there are exceptions). If this happens, the owner must have the same purpose as the name.

Some examples of possessives used as adjectives: there are some adjectives known as variable adjectives that do not change in their form. Most of them are either unusual colors or words of foreign origin. An example is web ace in the web pegina (the website) and read web peginas (web pages). Sometimes a name can be used as an immutable adjective, but this practice is much less common in Spanish than in English. Being a Spanish student will rarely have the need to use immutable adjectives, but you should be aware that they exist so that they don`t confuse you when you see them. Now try it for yourself. The following sentences contain adjectives only in the standard form (male, singular). The adjective of each sentence has been made bold to make things easier. It`s up to you to decide if they`re correct, and if they`re not, correct them.

Exception: for adjectives that end in z in the singular, change the z to a c before adding pluralistic subsidence.